Paved Biking Trails in St. George

St. George is famous for being a bike-friendly community. While there are countless off-road trails in the surrounding areas for skilled mountain biking, there’s also paved, mild-grade trails all throughout St. George for all skill levels. Keep in mind that these are all multi-use trails, meaning that you’ll likely run into non-bikers on the trail.

Virgin River Parkway

This 7 mile long trail begins at East Riverside Drive and ends at the Man o’ War Trailhead in Bloomington. An easy trail for all skill levels and ages, you can make the trip as short or long as you prefer. The trail provides little shade through the length of it, so come prepared with sunblock, hats, and plenty of water. For the best times to ride it, try it in the spring or fall, or ride it in the mornings during the summer. The trail becomes the City of Washington Mill Creek Trail after the 0.7 bike lane section on East Riverside Drive. This well-maintained paved path provides an excellent view of the Virgin River, trailing alongside the river with views of St. George and the Bloomington Country Club golf course.

Snow Canyon Loop

The Snow Canyon Loop is 18 miles round trip, stretching from the urban edges of Bluff Street to the deep red valleys of Snow Canyon. This easy-to-traverse trail is ideal for any length you want to make it, although there are steep grades throughout the trail that inexperienced bikers may have to walk. If you’re looking for a secluded, quiet trail with Southern Utah’s red trademark beauty, the Snow Canyon Loop is as close as it gets. Restrooms and drinks are available at the Snow Canyon campground. You’ll also be sharing this trail with other bikers, hikers, rollerbladers, and joggers, although this trail never feels crowded.

Sand Hollow Wash

This trail begins at the Sand Hollow Aquatic Center off of Sunset Drive and ends at Lava Flow Drive. This is a short trail just shy of a mile, stretching 0.9 miles in length (one way). This trail runs north to south, past Snow Canyon High School and the Dixie Downs area. Gentle slopes make up the length of it, so this is a great trail to take beginners and young children on. If you’re looking for an easy trail to exercise on frequently without the hassle of driving too far outside of town, this is a great day-to-day trail if you live in the area.

Halfway Wash Trail

The Halfway Wash Trail is a connecting trail to the Snow Canyon Loop, right at Snow Canyon Parkway. 1.9 miles long, this trail sits at the northern end of St. George and has stunning views of the red cliffs and the desert landscape. This is a shady trail that winds through parks and across bridges, providing an easy to moderate trail for all skill levels. Other trails that connect to Halfway Wash include Chuckwalla Trail, Paradise Rim Trail, and Turtle Wall trail, all easily accessed within the area. However, these adjacent trails are not all paved. Expect good surface conditions for this trail. There is an alternate trailhead for Halfway Wash east of the shopping center at Sunset and Dixie.

Fort Pierce Wash Trail

Crossing with the Virgin River Parkway trail, this short, easy trail is 0.7 miles in length with great views at the top. This trail meets with the east end of the Webb Hill Trail, and at the Larkspur trailhead, meets with the Bloomington Hills North Trail. This is the steepest part of the trail with an 8% grade. This trail is good for families with young children and is wheelchair accessible.

St. George Trails

Map of All St. George Trails via sgcity.com

Utah’s Best Arches

While the Delicate Arch has become Utah’s logo, in a sense – marking our license plates, billboards, keychains, calendars, and more – there are many astounding arches across Utah that aren’t as well-known but worth visiting. While many of these are in Arches National Park, they’re all worth putting on your bucket list for places to visit in Utah. Here’s a list of 10 stunning natural arches and bridge in Utah, including Delicate Arch – because what list of arches in Utah would be complete without Delicate Arch?

Double Arch

Double Arch

Also located in Arches National Park, these two sandstone arches are interesting because they share the same base and arc towards different directions, meeting with the massive red cliff face. The half mile round-trip hike is easy for all skill levels and ages, complete with beautiful wildflowers that are native to Utah. No matter what other hikes you’re doing in Arches, considering the length of this trail, it’s a must to visit these arches.

Rainbow Bridge

A familiar sight to those who travel to Lake Powell frequently, Rainbow Bridge National Monument is about as smooth and flawless as natural arches come. This rounded feat of nature is 290 feet tall and 270 feet across – as long as a football field. The bridge is considered sacred to the Navajo Nation, a representation of deities creating life in the desert, so it’s important to treat the area with respect when visiting.

Natural Bridge

This castle-like arch located in Bryce Canyon is a magnificent contrast to the towering pines and red hoodoos that populate the rest of the terrain. Good news for those who don’t like to hike – this arch requires no hiking whatsoever. It can be seen from the road to Rainbow Point, and there’s a parking lot for those who want to stop to get a better look.

Corona Arch

Corona Arch & Bowtie Arch

This massive arch located just west of Moab leans against the cliffside, overlooking the red desert wasteland that continues to the edge of the horizon. This is an easy, well-marked trail about 3 miles round-trip across slickrock. This is a great hike for kids, and what makes it even better, this is a two-in-one hike – Bowtie Arch is right around the corner, nestled into the mountainside.

Mesa Arch

One of Utah’s most photographed spots for good reason. This low-curving arch is at the edge of a tall mesa, overlooking a stunning desert landscape. The arch is in Canyonlands National Park and is an easy hike at .7 miles roundtrip. For avid landscape photographers, this is one of Utah’s most accessible arches waiting to be apart of your next photography road trip.

Landscape Arch

Want to see the largest natural arch in the Americas? Landscape Arch is what you’re looking for. Located in Arches National Park, this spindly, fragile-looking arch is a whopping 290 ft in span. The arch can be found at the end of the Devil’s Garden Trail, which is an easy, 1.5 mile round trip hike that winds through a Mars-like landscape in Arches.

Kolob Arch

Only three feet shy of Landscape Arch’s length of 290 feet, Kolob Arch has a span of 287 feet in Zion National Park. In fact, for a long time, it was considered the world’s longest arch due to different measuring methods. While this is a stunning hike that doesn’t experience frequent travelers, it comes at a cost in length, stretching to a 14 mile round-trip hike. This is why it’s commonly traversed as a multiple-day backpacking trip, as the average time to hike this is about 12 hours.

Sipapu Bridge

Sipapu Bridge

Named from a Hopi term for “opening between worlds”, this arch is 268 ft in length in span and 220 ft in height. This massive arch is located in National Bridges National Monument in southwestern Utah. Two other natural bridges are present at this monument, named Kachina and Owachomo, although Sipapu is the largest. The moderately-difficult hiking trail to get to Sipapu is 1.2 miles roundtrip and features ladders, switchbacks, and steep inclines on switchback.

Hickman Arch

This twisting, chromosome-like arch is located in Capitol Reef National Park. The moderately-difficult hiking trail for this arch is 1.8 miles roundtrip and features stunning canyon views at the arch, perfect for pictures overlooking the desert landscape.

Delicate Arch

The golden child of the arches in Utah that we all know and love, and for good reason. It stands out starkly against the rest of the rolling terrain, making it one of the most distinguishable arches on earth. The 3 mile round-trip hike is in Arches National Park, ranked as a moderately difficult hike with some rugged spots of steep inclines/declines.

Zion National Park – When Visitation Numbers Become a Concern

With Zion National Park’s tourism industry fueling a huge portion of Southern Utah’s economy, in past years, it’s not uncommon see promotions encouraging people to visit Zion and other national parks in Southern Utah. However, visitation is a growing concern, and it looks like marketing campaigns were successful. The popularity of Zion National Park has been growing at a steady rate, and it doesn’t appear to be slowing down – even with the centennial celebration of the parks in 2016, which was designed to draw more people to the parks, visitation numbers keep climbing.

But why is this an issue? If Zion National Park is doing so well to bring in travelers from all over the world to see its colorful sandstone slopes, and in turn bringing more business through St. George, Springdale, and surrounding areas, it’s helping the tourism industry in Southern Utah thrive. As good as it is for monetary reasons to local businesses, it’s hurting the landscape of Zion National Park. As great of an opportunity as it is for so many people to be able to experience the beauty and history of Zion at an affordable price, there are concerns for the preservation of the landscape. Extra visitation means extra wear and tear on the trails and the fragile ecosystem in the park. Trails and even off-trail areas where hikers are discouraged to go are being worn down at a faster rate. This could have a negative impact on the wildlife in the area, as well as the plants, rocks, streams, and other natural features that make up the park.

High visitation also makes it a more unpleasant experience to visitors. Going to the park and dealing with long lines for entry or packed trails eliminates the authenticity of the experience. And while Zion is the park experiencing huge visitation numbers, it’s not the only one. Bryce Canyon and Capitol Reef are also welcoming visitors by the millions every year. While Zion had 4.4 million visitors in 2017 (excluding December), and in 2016, Bryce had 2.5 million visitors, and Capitol Reef 1.1 million.

A few ideas are being considered to help throttle the visitation numbers in Zion National Park that would affect other national parks in Utah as well. One would be to increase the cost to get into the park to $70 per car during the peak season, where it’s now $25-30 per car to enter the park. Higher costs would certainly decrease visitation and discourage some from going, but Congresswoman Mia Love voiced an important concern – average to low-income families in Utah wouldn’t get to experience Zion because of the increase in prices.

Another idea the park has been considering would be to set up a reservation system to go to Zion National Park, which would help decrease visitation without hiking up the costs of entering the park. This would be the first national park to do so. The number of reservations would vary by season. However, this is also inconvenient to people traveling a long way to see Zion and stretching other plans to accommodate for specific reservation dates in Zion. While it’s unsure what will happen, it will take a couple years to implement the change they see fit to control park visitation.

Zion in the Winter

Zion in the winter – yes or no?

For avid hikers who can handle the cold, it’s a definite yes. The beauty of Zion National Park during the winter makes it almost a different park than you see during the warm months of the year, when visitors flood the park to enjoy the beauty and warmth of southern Utah. This lightly frosted landscape in the winter has a sense of untouched beauty to it, when park visitation numbers go down, and fewer people trek the sloping trails of Zion – especially after Christmas, from January-March.

For those who are less inclined to thrive in the cold, hold off on Zion until the spring, or keep your eye on the warmer days of winter and go during that time. While Southern Utah does flaunt mild, short winters, that doesn’t mean that it doesn’t get cold in Zion – this desert landscape still braces itself against cold temperatures during the late fall through early spring. The weather and temperatures fluctuate in the winter, so check the weather before your trip so you can pack and dress accordingly.

Be wary of ice

When visiting Zion during the winter, the most important part is to be wary of ice on the trails. While most trails are open year-round, they can be icy and slick once the sun melts the snow. It’s important to check the Zion Canyon Visitors Center beforehand to get an update on these trails, especially for trails like Angels Landing, Weeping Rock, Riverside Walk, Observation Point, and Emerald Pools, that experience sun and moisture and can lead to dangerous hiking conditions.

Get the right gear to stay dry

With proper gear, camping overnight in the park is feasible as well – even in a tent during the winter months. It’s important to use waterproof gear designed for zero-temp weather to accommodate for the cold, staying warm and dry even during the coldest nights of the year.

Be aware of road closures

The Zion and Springdale shuttle system is not in operation during the winter season, so private vehicles can drive through Zion Canyon using the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive. Keep your eye on the Current Conditions Page to check for any roads that are closed due to bad weather. Although Zion roads and the roads leading to Zion are open year round, like Kolob Terrace Road, Kolob Canyons Road, and Mt. Carmel Highway, these roads all experience frequent closures due to snow and other hazardous conditions during the winter, so it’s important to check this beforehand and plan your route accordingly.

Zion Winter Season Hours of Operation

Zion Canyon Visitor Center
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Closed Christmas Day

Zion Canyon Wilderness Desk
8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Closed Christmas Day

Zion Human History Museum
Closed during winter

Kolob Canyons Visitor Center
8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Closed Christmas Day

Hidden Gem Hikes Around St. George

Red Mountain Trail 

Just 12 miles north of Bluff Street on SR-18, Red Mountain Trailhead is a quiet but stunning trail that overlooks Snow Canyon. This overlook has a similar feel and grandeur overlook of Angel’s Landing, without the danger of the infamous last stretch of narrow rock and chains required to traverse the last portion of Angel’s Landing in Zion National Park.

The trailhead starts just past Diamond Valley, with a grand view of the Pine Valley Mountains. A small marked sign points westward as you approach the turnoff, and the trailhead starts close to SR-18. Bathrooms and a parking lot are available at the turnoff. Once you start on the hike, a slight incline on a rocky trail continues as you travel in a southwestern direction. The further you go on the trail, the forest of juniper and pinion becomes denser. While the trail is easily distinguishable most of the time, if it’s difficult to tell what direction to go at any time, continue to take the wide, left-ward paths.

Occasional cairns (stacks of rocks, and in this case, red sandstone) will mark the direction of where to go in situations where it’s a little harder to discern. Overall, the trail is fairly even and steady, without any sections that are overly steep or require you to climb on your hands and knees. Towards the end of the trail, the trail becomes sandy, which can be difficult to walk through for the elderly, small children, or those who have a hard time walking. Once you have reached the end of the trail, you are greeted with a stunning view overlooking the dead center of Snow Canyon from the back (north) side of the state park. White and red sandstone cliffs tower over the gentle terrain at the bottom of the canyon, and in the distance, you can view parts of Ivins, Santa Clara, and St. George. To head back, take the same route back to the trailhead.

This trail is 4.8 miles roundtrip, and generally takes 1 hour and 15 minutes each way (2.5 hours round trip) at a steady pace. At a slower pace, this hike will take closer to 3 hours. Bring plenty of water, as there are no water sources along the trail. This is an easy to moderate trail that’s free, beautiful, and great for all hiking skill levels  

Red Mountain Trail, Overlooking Snow Canyon

Anasazi Trail in Ivins

Another beautiful trail with little traffic is the Anasazi Valley Trail, or Tempi’po’op trail. This hike is an easy trail as well, and 3.5 miles roundtrip. For those interested in Native American history, this trail showcases plenty of petroglyphs – right in the open. This can also be an educational hike for the kids.

To get there, head west on Sunset boulevard for 7 miles. On the left, a sign will say, “Santa Clara River Reserve – Anasazi Valley Trailhead”. After a short dirt road that is less than a few hundred feet long, the trailhead will be on your left. Again, bring plenty of water on this hike, especially if it’s during the hotter months of the year.

There are two trails available to get to the top. The trail to the right is the shorter, steeper trail, although it is encouraged to take the left trail, as this one is the official trail and is easier for kids and stroller access. At the top of the trail, not only are there a striking array of petroglyphs to view, but old Anasazi Farmstead ruins are at the top of the trail as well. Not only does this hike have historical and cultural value, but it’s a beautiful hike showcasing Southern Utah’s red rock as well.

Things to do: St. George

St. George is full of beauty and an extremely rich history. From the prehistoric times, to the wild west, to now. Even though you may be a resident or just touring there is always something that you probably haven’t seen. These are just a few of the great things you can do.

  • Zion National Park

 

  • Beautiful red rocks, and scenic views. This is an amazing stop that you have to make. Millions of years in the making for you to view today.

 

  • Dinosaur Museum

 

activities

 

  • St. George has an abundance of dinosaur history and they show it off at their dinosaur museum. Similar to Zion’s the museum gives you a look into the past nearly 300 million years ago.

 

  • Tuacahn Amphitheater

 

 

tu

 

 

 

  • A nice relaxing night outside is only amplified by the great shows at Tuacahn. Not only are there great actors, but they have a great staff, and production value.
  • Air Tours

 

air

  • View St. George from above in a helicopter or hot air balloon. Being in the air to see the great vast nature of St. George is an absolute must.
  • Outdoor Sports

 

 

 

 

  • Hiking, riding, cycling, water sports, you name ibiket you can do it here. With the nice warm climate that we enjoy there is always something to do outside and the water is always refreshing.

 

 

 

  • Historical Sites

JimJonesExhibit

 

  • There are various different historical sites like Brigham Young’s winter home, Daughters of Utah Pioneers, or the Zion History Museum will teach you a little more about our rich history.

Traveling with children

Now that summer has arrived, it means it is time to soak in the sun and travel! Traveling with small children can be difficult at times, but we have four tips to help your trip run smoothly.

Let your child bring a backpack of essentials.

Before you hit the road, let your child bring a small backpack of their favorite items and snacks. This will keep them occupied while you are driving.

Capture memories.

Go to your local grocery store and buy a disposable camera for your little one. They will be able to take pictures of interesting things they see on the road and you can develop the pictures after the trip.

Watch movies.

What better way to keep your child occupied than playing their favorite movie? Better yet, bring a couple of their favorite movies so they can choose which one they would like to watch on the road.

Keep a first aid kit handy.

It is always better to come prepared. Just in case any injury occurs while on the road, it is nice to have a band aid or two in hand. Keep a first aid kit in the car.

We hope these travel tips are helpful! If you are making your way down to southern Utah, please stop by Ence Homes. Happy traveling!

Traveling with children

Now that summer has arrived, it means it is time to soak in the sun and travel! Traveling with small children can be difficult at times, but we have four tips to help your trip run smoothly.

Let your child bring a backpack of essentials.

Before you hit the road, let your child bring a small backpack of their favorite items and snacks. This will keep them occupied while you are driving.

kidCapture memories.

Go to your local grocery store and buy a disposable camera for your little one. They will be able to take pictures of interesting things they see on the road and you can develop the pictures after the trip.

cameraWatch movies.

What better way to keep your child occupied than playing their favorite movie? Better yet, bring a couple of their favorite movies so they can choose which one they would like to watch on the road.

caseKeep a first aid kit handy.

It is always better to come prepared. Just in case any injury occurs while on the road, it is nice to have a band aid or two in hand. Keep a first aid kit in the car.

 

first aid

 

We hope these travel tips are helpful! If you are making your way down to southern Utah, please stop by Ence Homes. Happy traveling!

Travel tips for summer vacations

You and your family are looking forward to some rest and relaxation away from your new homes in St. George humble abode. Before you pack your bags and go on holiday, take a look at these travel trips to ensure you have a wonderful and safe vacation.

Book your flight, rental car and housing reservations in advance to try to get the best deals. If you’re flying to your destination, try to book a non-stop flight versus a connecting flight. It’s easier and more convenient, especially if you’re traveling with young kids. If traveling by car, get your car checked out by a mechanic to ensure it’s ready for the road. Keep a spare tire, gas can and battery cables in your car.

Pack light and smart. There is no need to bring everything you own on vacation. Pack any medications your family members will need for the entire trip. Limit the number of credit cards and debit cards you take, leave your valuables at home and keep them all out of sight and in a safe place.

Look up the weather forecast for your trip. Bring a rain slicker or umbrella just in case you get an unexpected downpour.

Check around your home to make sure everything is locked up. Keep a light or two on to give the appearance you’re home. Don’t announce to the world you’re away, especially on Facebook and Twitter. The last thing you want to do is tell people you’re away from your new homes in St. George. Doing so is pretty much an open invitation for someone to break into your home.

Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated and to prevent fatigue and jet lag. Don’t bring sunburn home as a souvenir. Pack plenty of sunscreen and apply it at least 20 minutes before heading out in the sun.

Have a buddy system and a contingency plan if someone gets lost. Keep your phones charged and make sure every one has each other’s numbers. Let a relative or friend know your itinerary and where you’ll be at all times in case of an emergency.

You may want to suspend mail and newspaper delivery if you’re going to be away from your new homes in St. George for an extended period of time. If you don’t want to do that, you can always entrust a family member, friend or Ence Home neighbor to pick up your deliveries.

Leave your worries and stress at home. Have fun and enjoy your vacation.

Travel tips for summer vacations

You and your family are looking forward to some rest and relaxation away from your new homes in St. George humble abode. Before you pack your bags and go on holiday, take a look at these travel trips to ensure you have a wonderful and safe vacation.

Book your flight, rental car and housing reservations in advance to try to get the best deals. If you’re flying to your destination, try to book a non-stop flight versus a connecting flight. It’s easier and more convenient, especially if you’re traveling with young kids. If traveling by car, get your car checked out by a mechanic to ensure it’s ready for the road. Keep a spare tire, gas can and battery cables in your car.

Pack light and smart. There is no need to bring everything you own on vacation. Pack any medications your family members will need for the entire trip. Limit the number of credit cards and debit cards you take, leave your valuables at home and keep them all out of sight and in a safe place.

Look up the weather forecast for your trip. Bring a rain slicker or umbrella just in case you get an unexpected downpour.

Check around your home to make sure everything is locked up. Keep a light or two on to give the appearance you’re home. Don’t announce to the world you’re away, especially on Facebook and Twitter. The last thing you want to do is tell people you’re away from your new homes in St. George. Doing so is pretty much an open invitation for someone to break into your home.

Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated and to prevent fatigue and jet lag. Don’t bring sunburn home as a souvenir. Pack plenty of sunscreen and apply it at least 20 minutes before heading out in the sun.

Have a buddy system and a contingency plan if someone gets lost. Keep your phones charged and make sure every one has each other’s numbers. Let a relative or friend know your itinerary and where you’ll be at all times in case of an emergency.

You may want to suspend mail and newspaper delivery if you’re going to be away from your new homes in St. George for an extended period of time. If you don’t want to do that, you can always entrust a family member, friend or Ence Home neighbor to pick up your deliveries.

Leave your worries and stress at home. Have fun and enjoy your vacation.